Courses

PED-233: Political Economy After the Crisis

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

The world’s economic and political order reels under mounting challenges: the global financial crisis, the austerity debacle, a slowdown in economic growth and productivity, the aggravation of inequality and the inadequacy of conventional responses to it, the discrediting of the Washington Consensus, the globalization backlash, the re-emergence of nationalist politics in Europe and the United States, and a contest over the meaning, value, and requirements of democracy. We examine connections among these phenomena and explore alternative ways of thinking about contemporary market economies… Read more about PED-233: Political Economy After the Crisis

PED 101: Economic Development: Theory and Evidence

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

PED-101 is a semester-long course that aims to study theories of economic (under)development and scrutinize empirical evidence in order to glean insights on development policy. The course will identify key features of the development process across countries, and develop an analytical framework, grounded in economic theory, to better understand these patterns. We will then apply our frameworks combined with rigorous empirical evidence to identify when and how public policies can enable economic growth and development. Topics include economic growth and its proximate determinants; resource… Read more about PED 101: Economic Development: Theory and Evidence

API-525: Ideas and Interests

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

Government policies are often said to be determined by powerful vested interests. But where do political actors get their ideas about what’s in their interest? This seminar focuses on ideas of three different kinds – on who we are, how the world works, and what the feasible options are – and analyzes how each shape the formulation of policy interests. We will first develop an analytical framework on the interaction of ideas and interests in policy formulation. The bulk of the course will then focus on cases drawn from different policy domains in advanced and developing societies:… Read more about API-525: Ideas and Interests

PED-101: Economic Development: Theory and Evidence

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

PED-101 is a semester-long course that aims to study theories of economic (under)development and scrutinize empirical evidence in order to glean insights to design development policy. The course will identify key features of the development process across countries, and develop an analytical framework, grounded in economic theory, to better understand these patterns. We will then apply our frameworks combined with rigorous empirical evidence to identify when and how public policies can enable economic growth and development. Macro topics include economic growth and its proximate… Read more about PED-101: Economic Development: Theory and Evidence

PED-102M: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: USING ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORKS TO DESIGN POLICY

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2013

This is a half-semester module (taught over the course of the semester) that examines how economic theory and rigorous evidence can be harnessed to design development policies that respond to market and political failures in developing economies. The module builds on the analytical framework and evidence base provided in PED-101 (which is a prerequisite). Topics covered include: Policies for Productivity Growth, Policy Design for Markets in Human and Financial, Capital and Governance Reform. Prerequisite: PED-101.… Read more about PED-102M: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: USING ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORKS TO DESIGN POLICY

PED-233: Political Economy After the Crisis

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2013

This course will explore alternative ways of thinking about contemporary market economies and their reconstruction. It will do so by addressing three connected themes: the worldwide financial and economic crisis and the response to it, the effort to advance socially inclusive economic growth in richer as well as in poorer countries, and the past, present, and future of globalization. In addressing these themes, it will ask what economics is and should become. Students should have some previous acquaintance with economics, but no advanced economic training is required. The course is addressed to undergraduate and graduate students outside as well as within economics. Readings are drawn from the classic and contemporary literatures of economics, philosophy, and social theory. There is an extended take-home examination.… Read more about PED-233: Political Economy After the Crisis

PED-101: Economic Development: Theory, Evidence, and Policy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2012

This is a semester long course that provides a graduate-level overview of the theory of, and evidence on, economic development and the design of development policy. The course will identify key features of the development process across countries, and then combine an analytical framework with rigorous empirical evidence to identify when and how public policies can enable economic growth and development. Topics covered include: contemporary and historic features of development; household models of development and investment in human capital; economy-wide models of trade and growth; and structural transformation.… Read more about PED-101: Economic Development: Theory, Evidence, and Policy

ITF-145: THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE OF GLOBALIZATION

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2012

The 2008-2009 financial crisis has highlighted the frailties of the current model of economic globalization and has raised questions about its future. This course analyzes economic globalization in an historical perspective. It evaluates the arguments of both its critics and advocates, and pays particular attention to problems of trade, finance, and economic development in an economically integrating world. It discusses different models of economic globalization and global governance, with an eye towards future possibilities. Prerequisites: A previous course in economics desirable.